By Beca Russell Designs

Quilling City

Cray Quilling by Beca Russell DeignsThis gallery is to show my progress though out making my first Quilled city. This is linked to the what I had published in the Quillers Guild spring 2014 magazines.

City of quills

Quilling Guild member Beca Russell is a student at the London College of Communication (part of the University of the Arts London), studying Surface Design. A dedicated quiller, Beca wrote to the Guild at the beginning of the year, explaining that some of her work was to be displayed at a gallery show in the College, as part of a project featuring ‘Design for Industry’. She told us: “I have been trying to modernise quilling and take it into a new direction, using screen printing/printmaking alongside traditional quilling methods”. We were intrigued … so Committee members Cathy Russell, Jill Chapman and Philippa Reid went along to the show which was staged in mid-January – and this is what we found!Crazy Quilling By Beca Russel

“The design really developed as I went along”, she continues. ” It encouraged me to try making fringed flowers and other techniques that were new to me, and I ended up learning new skills.”

 Beca had several screen prints of her quillings left over, and decided to cut them into wide strips and roll them so that the pattern would show on the sides, adding to the overall effect of the finished piece.

“I like the idea of not sticking to the traditional motifs normally used by quillers but going in a very different direction to bring a more modern look and feel to quilling”, concludes Beca.

Crazy Quilling By Beca RusselBeca’s main exhibit was a wall installation entitled ‘City of Quills’ in which a colourful array of quilled pieces and prints were mounted on to a series of canvases, incorporating a very wide variety of techniques, strip widths, patterns and textures.

“I spent a really long time making quills using various techniques to create shapes and flowers, some of which I turned into screen prints”, says Beca. “I used the prints to form spaces between the areas where I would place the traditional quills on my final piece.”

“The design really developed as I went along”, she continues. ” It encouraged me to try making fringed flowers and other techniques that were new to me, and I ended up learning new skills.”

Beca had several screen prints of her quillings left over, and decided to cut them into wide strips and roll them so that the pattern would show on the sides, adding to the overall effect of the finished piece.

“I like the idea of not sticking to the traditional motifs normally used by quillers but going in a very different direction to bring a more modern look and feel to quilling”, concludes Beca.

A big Thank You to Philippa Reid.



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